Jacobsen’s Organ

organ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bellow’s of air through Jacobsen’s Organ

change smells instrument to sound and vision.

These two small olfactory sense organs

where Mom’s cooking lies upon an axon,

once, and still, called the Vomeronasal.

Ludwig Jacobsen called it an organ,

base of nasal in a crescent lumen

tucked in between sweet blankets of new scent

that bring to mind colors of long sunsets,

details of wallpaper from where your born,

illustrations of lucid memory,

smell to bring back the feel of sensory.

 

Some say it only helps wild snakes find prey,

Salamanders use Jacobsen’s Organ,

let dogs keep track of the smells of the day,

Painted Turtles smell territory,

some say that with our enlightened vision

humans have lost through evolution

use of this Organ, when I close my eyes

and frame a colorful portrait of smell

as I see the faces of loves detail,

softness of their skin in olfactory,

reexamine definition of sense

realize the greatness of such small vents.

 

So how does this work, this sense of our scent?

Axons project to the Accessory

Olfactory Bulbs, double normal scent

bulbs, then hit the Amygdala, meant

for Hypothalamus, central Organ.

Where memory is targeted and sent

deep into the mass of mind where pent

up life is released and sent on missions

In Technicolor, religious vision

seen without our eyes, what a power scent

has on our psyche, is this what they call

the place where we hide, the place called the soul.

 

I banter on about vision and smell

In reproductive behavior, our scent

of a phermone can bring on arousal,

a dream of sex, a sexy proposal.

To have fallen in love in late May

smells of delicate colorful petals

linger in your nostrils, your soul.

If love is found through Jacobsen’s Organ,

that feeling that stays, lingers in vision,

as if you must have it, to hold it all,

until you hold a certain phermone

forever, oh Jacobsen’s Organ.

 

The Nucleas of Stria Termin-

alis lies smells of colors of fall,

life condensed into poetic visions,

a smell that could be a master plan

bring us together with powerful scent,

as much power as sight, or as touch can

produce.  There maybe other organs

that work hard to keep us at play

that work together as a team everyday,

our hearts, our lungs, and other organs,

you seem in command Jacobsen’s Organ,

you lead our team Jacobsen’s Organ.

 

Jacobsen found his powerful organ

and we saw it as part of Darwin’s plan.

There is so much more to our sense of scent,

Seems to be remind us to go out and play.

Jamie Lee Hamann
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Jamie Lee Hamann

My name is Jamie Lee Hamann and I have a passion for writing short fiction and poetry. I started writing for TCE around 2015 and since then I have finished seven collections of poetry and plans for more. I currently live in Lemmon Valley NV with my family. If you desire to find my other work on the internet feel free to stop by my website simplepoetics.weebly.com. The website offers articles on poetry, poems, and links to all my other writing.

6 thoughts on “Jacobsen’s Organ

  • May 28, 2016 at 7:45 AM
    Permalink

    Wow, Jamie, I am impressed. What an intelligent poem, and a biology lesson all in one. Well done.

    Reply
    • June 19, 2016 at 5:57 PM
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      This poem was motivated by a book entitled “Jacobsen’s Organ.” It was a great read for a science book. Thank you John for stopping by!

      Reply
  • May 28, 2016 at 3:33 PM
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    Jamie I love how you artfully,skillfully used your sense of mental creativity to craft this brilliant smorgasborg of olfactory senses. For without them we animals would not function properly in so many ways. Bravo, very well constructed work.

    Reply
  • May 29, 2016 at 3:41 AM
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    Wonderful Jamie, a lesson of biology woven into prose, and inspiring it is, what God have given us all in ability to relate to our environment and survive. Great, really enjoyed the work. Cheers!

    Reply

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