Why Do Writers Write?

Why do writers write?

“Why do writers write?” you ask.

They write because they must,

Their pen is drawn towards the page,

Or fingers to the keyboard.

They write because they love it,

Or have a tale to tell,

Or simply must express themselves

The best way they know how.

Writers write to please themselves

As well as those who read.

Good comments are a bonus

And fill an inner need.

Writers are a lonely bunch,

They mostly work alone.

Sometimes until the midnight hour.

Time’s nothing to a muse.

Writers reach down deep within

For a message to convey,

They need to share it with the world.

It is the writer’s way.

Most writers don’t make millions,

That’s just the select few.

The majority don’t make enough

To pay the bills accrued.

So, spare a thought for writers

Whatever they may write,

Poets, authors, song writers

Who may not sleep at night.

Writers slave away for hours

For often scant reward.

Words sometimes uninspired or lack

So please respect “the word.”

John Hansen

Longtime poet but not in the traditional technical sense. I enjoy rhyme but like to experiment and dabble in many different forms and maybe even make up some of my own. There is always a message or lesson I want to promote through my writing, for that reason, my poetry generally shies away from the abstract and obscure.

After a lot of procrastinating I have finally self-published my first eBooks of poetry "I Laughed a Smile" and "On the Wings of Eagles" at Lulu.com.Now I find myself branching out and experimenting with short fiction.

I have also been fortunate to have two poems chosen to be made into songs and recorded. The first "On the Road to Kingdom Come" by Al Wordlaw, and the second, "If I Could Write a Love Poem" by award-winning Israeli/British singer Tally Koren.

I am also finding my services increasingly in demand as a freelance writer and I have ghost-written the text for a number of children's books and educational tutorials.

It has taken me many years of searching and restlessness to realise that my life's passion is to write. It saddens me that I wasted so many years not devoting to that, but thinking positively, the experiences gained over those years is now wonderful material for my stories and poems.

I want to try to bring a new focus on poetry and try to make it appealing to a new generation of young people and those who thought they never liked or understood it before.

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John Hansen

Longtime poet but not in the traditional technical sense. I enjoy rhyme but like to experiment and dabble in many different forms and maybe even make up some of my own. There is always a message or lesson I want to promote through my writing, for that reason, my poetry generally shies away from the abstract and obscure. After a lot of procrastinating I have finally self-published my first eBooks of poetry "I Laughed a Smile" and "On the Wings of Eagles" at Lulu.com. Now I find myself branching out and experimenting with short fiction. I have also been fortunate to have two poems chosen to be made into songs and recorded. The first "On the Road to Kingdom Come" by Al Wordlaw, and the second, "If I Could Write a Love Poem" by award-winning Israeli/British singer Tally Koren. I am also finding my services increasingly in demand as a freelance writer and I have ghost-written the text for a number of children's books and educational tutorials. It has taken me many years of searching and restlessness to realise that my life's passion is to write. It saddens me that I wasted so many years not devoting to that, but thinking positively, the experiences gained over those years is now wonderful material for my stories and poems. I want to try to bring a new focus on poetry and try to make it appealing to a new generation of young people and those who thought they never liked or understood it before.

12 thoughts on “Why Do Writers Write?

  • December 21, 2018 at 2:49 AM
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    Great piece John – and so very true. You have once again spoken not only for yourself, but for all those that have to write. I write poetry for me and no one else. It is my way of understanding my life and the ups and downs of everyday living. If someone reads my poetry and finds some meaning or makes them smile or shed a tear then that is an added plus. When I write my novels I am never alone during that time that the story is being written , my characters become friends and or foes that I know intimately. I love both mediums even though I do not consider myself a great poet or writer of novels, but that of a storyteller.

    Reply
  • December 21, 2018 at 3:09 AM
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    Thank you Kurt. I often seem espoused to write on behalf of myself and other writers about our craft. Admittedly it may not be falling on lay ears but I feel the need to express it anyway. You are one of the best storytellers I know. I can relate to the characters in your novels becoming friends and foes. Take care.

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  • December 21, 2018 at 3:40 AM
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    Such a great message to readers and a wonderful tribute to writers. Writers are very giving persons who give from their heart and soul. They are unselfish, for they send out their words from lonely, long hours to all. I write because I love to – it is a need to pass on the legacy of storytelling my father left to me, and a bit of poetry once in awhile that wants to be said. Thank you for this poem, this great tribute to all us writers.

    A blessed, Merry Merry Christmas to you and your loved ones.

    Reply
  • December 21, 2018 at 3:54 AM
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    Phyllis, I really appreciate you reading this. Writers would have to be among the most giving of all professions. We are often underpaid and underappreciated for the work we do, but as with you, I write because I love it. I think that is the same for many writers. I also wish you a very Merry Christmas and look forward to what the New Year holds for The Creative Exiles.

    Reply
  • December 21, 2018 at 5:44 AM
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    You’re absolutely right John , I began writing alone stuffing he pages away so that no one WOULD actually see them secretly wondering however -What if they did ? What if I somehow displayed them ?
    When I finally did the comments actually were the seeds of much more writing on HP ! Now however because of the direction HP took I deleted all of my work there .
    Somehow I forgot to return that to new writers .
    Great words of wisdom John !

    The greatest words of wisdom go unpublished – We all need to think about that .

    Reply
  • December 21, 2018 at 5:51 AM
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    I was like you Ed. I had notebooks and files full of unpublished writing that no one had read stashed away for years. Then I joined HP and eventually dusted them off, updated them and published. I was surprised how well most was received and it was very encouraging for me to write more.
    Thank you for reading and especially, commenting. Much appreciated.

    Reply
    • December 21, 2018 at 6:52 PM
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      Yes, Jamie, it certainly is one crazy journey. Once bitten by the bug there is no turning back.

      Reply
  • December 21, 2018 at 2:05 PM
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    I began my journey of writing back in 2008 when challenged by another writer at Hub pages to pen a poem, I haven’t stopped writing since, thus the bug was in me to continue writing. I’ve since written 3 small books of poetry and the journey continues. I find writing to be solitary, often confining and tedious. I mostly write in dark, gloomy fits, in dark moments, most of my writing is done later in the evenings, for some reason my Muse stimulates my senses and badgers me best at an ungodly hour. I’ve gone stale at times, loss for words and interest, until I’m drawn back once more by a Muse who always lurks in the shadows. It’s an exciting rut many of us find ourselves in, yet I for one have this yearning deep within to be heard, so that is why I write John. You’ve captured the essence of a writer with this poem and I fall into that category my friend.

    Reply
  • December 21, 2018 at 6:51 PM
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    Thank you, Vincent, my friend. I can relate to all you say. I have written poetry and a few short stories, or “letters to the editor” of local newspapers since schooldays. But most of what I wrote was just filed away for no one else’s eyes until I joined HubPages. The positive comments and encouragement I received there ignited the spark in me as well.
    An idea or inspiration often comes to me when least expected, while I am doing a chore such as dishes etc….then I race to write the idea down. Hours later, maybe midnight, the words I need to create the piece will start to form in my head. If I go more than a couple of days without writing I start to fret.

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  • December 21, 2018 at 10:25 PM
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    So many truths in the above comments. Once i felt comfortable with penning poetry and i knew that the audience accepted my skill and possibly even enjoyed it, i started writing more. I always find myself with a thought and end up with a ton of verse that i try to edit through or just say screw it and leave it all on the page. It is true i am mostly alone when i write as well. Its almost like a protected nook that no one can bother me in. Nice work as always my friend. And have a happy holiday.

    Reply
  • December 21, 2018 at 10:40 PM
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    Thanks for reading this Paul, and for sharing your own writing processes. Wishing you all the best this holiday season also.

    Reply

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