Weeping Willow Tree Sonnet – Claude Monet Series

My Weeping Willow tree Sonnet stems from my love for the willow and all trees. I also love the impressionism paintings of Claude Monet, so chose his work as inspiration for a series of sonnets.

Weeping Willow
Claude Monet, Weeping Willow, 1918

The Willow has a feminine spiritual nature. It is attune to the ebb and flow of the lunar tides. In mythology and literature the Willow is symbolic of the moon, water, grief, healing and everlasting life. As a feminine spirit the  Willow is associated with emotions, sensitivity, and intuition.

I wrote this Sonnet in the Occitan format, with the rhyme scheme of ABAB ABAB CDCDCD.

Weeping Willow Tree Sonnet

Weeping willow tree, so graceful is she,
with delicate tendrils to gently sway
at the will of playful Zephyr’s soft breeze,
a vision of quiet calm to the day.

So sensitive to moods is willow tree,
she flows with the ebb and tides far away
where the past still flows upon Luna’s sea,
with eternal memory the tides play.

Willow, you stand so tall, reach for the sky,
for you have high aspirations within,
you watch the birds as they leave you and fly
and wish you could go with them to begin
a journey of wonder, beyond, so high,
yet your spirit soars, so Willow don’t cry.

Weeping Willow
Claude Monet, Weeping Willow, 1919

~~~

Occitan Sonnet

The sole confirmed surviving sonnet in the Occitan language is confidently dated to 1284, and is conserved only in troubadour manuscript P, an Italian chansonnier of 1310, now XLI.42 in the Biblioteca Laurenziana in Florence. It was written by Paolo Lanfranchi da Pistoia and is addressed to Peter III of Aragon. It employs the rhyme scheme ABAB ABAB CDCDCD:

Valiant Lord, king of the Aragonese
to whom honour grows every day closer,
remember, Lord, the French king
that has come to find you and has left France
With his two sons and that one of Artois;
but they have not dealt a blow with sword or lance
and many barons have left their country:
but a day will come when they will have some to remember.
Our Lord make yourself a company
in order that you might fear nothing;
that one who would appear to lose might win.
Lord of the land and the sea,
as whom the king of England and that of Spain
are not worth as much, if you wish to help them.
– Pistoia

For more information on the Occitan Sonnet visit https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonnet

~~~~

© 2018 Phyllis Doyle Burns

 

Phyllis Doyle Burns
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Phyllis Doyle Burns

Site Manager, Senior Editor at The Creative Exiles
I have always liked to write.It is important to me that I write with spirit and heart. When writing poetry, if I do not feel a spiritual connection to what I am writing on, I will discard it and go on to something I can connect with on a spiritual level. I live in the moment, I write from the past or beyond the veil. When writing fiction I go with whatever inspires me at the moment - it could be funny, sorrowful, romantic or sometimes done with the use of colloquial language from mountain folk or other cultural regions. Thank you for visiting.
Phyllis Doyle Burns
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Phyllis Doyle Burns

I have always liked to write. It is important to me that I write with spirit and heart. When writing poetry, if I do not feel a spiritual connection to what I am writing on, I will discard it and go on to something I can connect with on a spiritual level. I live in the moment, I write from the past or beyond the veil. When writing fiction I go with whatever inspires me at the moment - it could be funny, sorrowful, romantic or sometimes done with the use of colloquial language from mountain folk or other cultural regions. Thank you for visiting.

8 thoughts on “Weeping Willow Tree Sonnet – Claude Monet Series

  • November 18, 2018 at 8:03 PM
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    I love Monet too, in fact most of the impressionists: just love what they can achieve with seemingly little detail. A wonderful sonnet too and the historic note is great. A dutifully expressed and rendered piece Phyllis. Really enjoyed.

    Reply
    • November 18, 2018 at 9:48 PM
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      Ah! I thought you would love Monet, Tony. His works are so appealing with his study in color and shadows. I am so glad you enjoyed the sonnet and historic notes. Thank you so much. Take care.

      Reply
  • November 20, 2018 at 10:01 AM
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    I love the symbolism of the weeping willow tree, so beautifully expressed in your stunning sonnet. I’ve seen many weeping willows in my trucking days through some of your beautiful states such as Georgia and Kentucky. Like Tony, I too love the impressionists and one of my favorites of Monet’s is Garden at Saint-Adhesse 1867, I could see myself sitting there having a glass of red wine, watching the beautiful water scene in front of me. His brush strokes are simply magnificent, what a wonderful period of painters. Well done Phyllis, loved your sonnet and historic notes.

    Reply
    • November 20, 2018 at 11:39 AM
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      Ah! Another lover of impressionists! I think the beauty of impressionism is that the image comes directly from the beauty of the painter’s heart and soul. Monet never copied an image, rather, he looked deeper and brought out the light and shadows created by the sun. When one paints the shadows and the light between, then the subject appears like magic in all its splendor. I am so happy you enjoyed my sonnet and historical notes, Vincent, and I thank you for the lovely praise. I so appreciate your appreciation, for I am trying to create sonnets which flow with emotion and spirituality. Sonnets once intimidated me – now I find much enjoyment in writing them. Thank you, Vincent – you have lifted my spirit.

      Reply
  • November 28, 2018 at 11:40 PM
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    Phyllis, lovely sonnets here. I particularly like the first ‘The Weeping Willow Tree’.Like all commenters, I love the painting of the Impressionists including Monet, Van Gogh, Degas etc. I adore the Van Gogh book you recently sent. Good job.

    Reply
    • November 29, 2018 at 2:23 AM
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      Thank you, John. I appreciate your kind words. I am so happy you love the Van Gogh book. It is very impressive and beautiful. Take care.

      Reply
  • December 3, 2018 at 6:00 AM
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    Phyllis I believe your heart speaks here in this piece. If one looks and sees he can see your soul in your writing. Very much enjoyed.

    Reply
  • December 3, 2018 at 4:29 PM
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    Thank you, Kurt, for such a lovely comment. So, you have seen my heart and soul indeed. Yes, it is there in the Willow, in Luna, in the wind …

    Blessings to you, Kurt. Take care.

    Reply

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