Five Stages of Grief – Stage Five – Acceptance

Acceptance

A strange finality

The pieces fitting, although tenuously

Looking back courageously

Episodic moments occasionally

Nothing like the used to be

Time it seems has been the key

I was blind, but now I see

Realizing what’s become of me

I’m different than I used to be

She’s gone, no more lies

No more prayers to cloudless skies

No more weepy eyes

I’m letting go of the pain

Forgiven myself for taking the blame

Realized the bout with shame

Just looking to reclaim

The man, or some of who the man I was

Quietly without applause

I need to do it, just because

Life still has a plan for me

My tears are dried, I have the key

To finding peace inside of me

The cemetery visits are fewer now

We’ve come to terms with it somehow

Don’t judge me as it’s helped me cope

Kept my neck from finding a rope

The thought of her listening gave me hope

When all that was lost, was suddenly found

Quietly, without a sound

I emerged from the darkness to face the day

Not too certain about what to say

I just let my heart do the talking

My feet took over and I went walking

I found the doors of those who cared

Poured out my soul and laughed and shared

Fell to my knees and begged forgiveness

Even though I’m not religious

And I cried and cried, and cried some more

Surrendered from the lengthy war

Emotions came from within my core

Offering a tearful thank you

Calling it some kind of breakthrough

Remembering how they helped me pull through

Now I’m going to follow through

Starting my life anew

But never going to forget you…

 

Author’s Note

This piece is the fifth in a series that encompasses the five stages of grief – they are denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and finally acceptance.  The analysis of human experiences, especially when it comes to how we deal with emotional tragedies, leads to discoveries that are unlike anything else known to humankind.  It is with the utmost reverence and respect for those who are currently experiencing any of these stages that I’m undertaking this delicate series of poems.  I hope that in some small way, they help someone, anyone, to find the strength to take the next step toward healing and eventually reaching inner peace.

R J Schwartz

I write about everything and sometimes nothing at all.I'm fascinated by old things, rusty things, abandoned places, or anywhere that a secret might be unearthed.I'm passionate about history and many of my pieces are anchored in one concept of time or another.I've always been a writer, dating back to my youth, but the last decade has been a time of growth for me.I'm continually pushing the limitations of vocabulary, syntax, and descriptive phrasing.

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R J Schwartz

I write about everything and sometimes nothing at all. I'm fascinated by old things, rusty things, abandoned places, or anywhere that a secret might be unearthed. I'm passionate about history and many of my pieces are anchored in one concept of time or another. I've always been a writer, dating back to my youth, but the last decade has been a time of growth for me. I'm continually pushing the limitations of vocabulary, syntax, and descriptive phrasing.

3 thoughts on “Five Stages of Grief – Stage Five – Acceptance

  • March 30, 2017 at 12:07 AM
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    Ralph, I read again, through all five stages without stopping. As one piece it is showing great insight and understanding of what the grieving one goes through and grows spiritually in the process. It is so accurate to what I went through grieving for my brother, my hero, my protector. So much was lost and the realization of what once was had left my life was devastating. I am thinking back, and believe the depression stage was the most difficult and lasted so long. Reaching that final stage of acceptance opened me to what his life brought to my own – it was then that I could cherish the memories and honor his life. Each type of relationship loss is different, and it is all unique to each person suffering, however, you covered it well, very well. It even helped me, after all these years since brother died in 2007, for there are times it hits me unexpectedly and to understand the natural healing process you took us through with the entire work is immensely healing. Old love never dies, it just goes to a quieter place

    Reply

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