Narrow Passage

Narrow Passage …

narrow passage
Narrow Passage

Deep in the cave Emmet found a narrow passage he had not seen before. It was too narrow at top to walk in,
but he got on his hands and knees to peer in as far as he could. His flashlight lit about ten feet or so then
there was a curve to the left. The passage was wide enough to crawl in, but too narrow for him to turn
around. He would have to back out if it ended around the curve, or keep going if it went on till he found a
place to stand up or at least turn around if he had to. He decided to give it a go. It may be his only chance to
escape and he knew they would pick up on his trail soon. He could faintly hear them off in the distance and chills ran down his back.

What if I get stuck in there with no way out? He figured there was no time for wondering, so he started in.
The floor of the narrow passage had a lot of small stones that hurt his hands and knees, but he kept going.
He was very relieved when he made it around the curve and saw the passage was getting wider and higher.
After about ten more minutes of crawling he was able to stand up. He had to watch for low areas. One hard
bump on the head made him pay more attention. As the passage opened up considerably he stopped. He
could hear them much easier now. They had found the narrow passage entrance and it sounded like they
were coming in. His time was running out and he had to find an escape route fast.

Emmet was stunned when he turned another bend and walked into a large room. The cave was full of them,
but this was the largest he had seen. On all the walls were crystals of all sizes. Having no time to stay there
and admire the beauty he looked all around and saw several openings to he knew not where. He ran to enter
the closest passage, hoping it was the right one. They were catching up to him fast and it sounded like the
whole pack was coming now.

He was lucky, this passage was wide, high and much lighter. Now he ran as fast as he could. After a few
minutes an opening to outside appeared. They were running now too, and much closer. He could almost
hear them breathing from the effort to catch him. He reached the opening and dove out, not knowing what
he would hit. He landed face down in about two feet of mud at the edge of a creek. Struggling to stand up he
saw them approaching then they stopped and glared at him. The Alpha started toward him slowly.

Coughing and sputtering he stood up and faced them. He was tired and sore, could go no further. Emmet
stared at them then yelled. “You guys suck at being wolves!”

“Good job, Emmet. You passed your initiation. We’ll celebrate with pizza at Charlies.” Joe waded in the
mud and grabbed Emmet in a bear hug. They both fell and the rest of the group jumped in. “Mud fight!”
someone yelled.
~ ~ ~

© 2016 Phyllis Doyle Burns

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Phyllis Doyle Burns

Chief Editor at The Creative Exiles
I have always liked to write.It is important to me that writing comes from my heart and soul. When writing poetry, if I do not feel a spiritual connection to what I am writing on, I will discard it and go on to something I can connect with on a spiritual level. I live in the moment, I write from the past or beyond the veil. When writing fiction I go with whatever inspires me at the moment - it could be funny, sorrowful, romantic or sometimes done with the use of colloquial language from mountain folk or other cultural regions. Thank you for visiting.
Phyllis Doyle Burns
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Phyllis Doyle Burns

I have always liked to write. It is important to me that writing comes from my heart and soul. When writing poetry, if I do not feel a spiritual connection to what I am writing on, I will discard it and go on to something I can connect with on a spiritual level. I live in the moment, I write from the past or beyond the veil. When writing fiction I go with whatever inspires me at the moment - it could be funny, sorrowful, romantic or sometimes done with the use of colloquial language from mountain folk or other cultural regions. Thank you for visiting.

2 thoughts on “Narrow Passage

  • October 15, 2016 at 9:33 PM
    Permalink

    Nice twist and well penned Phyllis, building the tension until that one moment of release. Well done.

    Reply
    • October 16, 2016 at 5:21 AM
      Permalink

      Thank you, Tony. I have been reading about Mammoth Cave and was inspired to write this. It was fun. Glad you like it. Take care.

      Reply

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